Personalised packaging

The Power of Personalised Packaging

Personalised packaging design has been on the rise during 2018. With the concept of bespoke packaging also taking off, some companies have taken this customisation a step further to make products look more desirable to consumers.

Brand packaging is getting personal, but why is using someones name so effective?

  • Connect with customers; when they see their name on a product it instills a sense of importance. Good packaging should lead to customer satisfaction and an enjoyable purchasing experience. Personalisation helps to build better and stronger relationships between brands and consumers. It increases customer engagement and brand awareness, therefore resulting in improved business.
  • Create value; customising mundane products turns them into something unique. Digital technology is allowing for a wide range of personalisation opportunities. This allows ordinary, everyday items to hold more importance on the shelf. Personalisation is a quick and easy method of making a product appear unique and enticing. By doing this, brands can also increase the value of these products, literally and figuratively. It’s also one way to encourage reuse, with some packaging items turning into collectors items.
  • Meets long term needs; personalised packaging design can help brands understand their customers better. It can be used to inform future brand engagements, emphasis certain brand values and foster a sense of community amongst their target market.

Coca-cola’s cans and bottles featuring common first names started a growing trend. The ‘Share a Coke’ campaign highlighted how successful personalisation can be. The campaign began after the realisation that young people weren’t connecting with the brand, so Coca-cola decided to communicate directly with this demographic, and increase its impact on the shelf.

Coca cola personalised packaging, not designed by AKGraphics

Coca cola personalised packaging, not designed by AKGraphics

 

Irn-Bru (a Scottish soft drink brand) responded to Coca-cola’s campaign with a personalisation of their own. They created bottles with 56 different Scottish tartan designs –one for each major clan, and one Irn-Bru design. Irn-Bru recognised that “you don’t want people to always find their own clan tartan straightaway, but within a reasonable number of store visits so they become a bit of a collector’s item. So you need to find a way to distribute a random mix of the samples.”

Irn-Bru tartan labels, not designed by AKGraphics

Irn-Bru tartan labels, not designed by AKGraphics

 

Nutella’s personalisation campaign was built around how people already use the chocolate spread in meals and snacks. ‘Your Nutella, your way’ invites people to personalise a jar and share their ‘Nutella Stories’ on Nutella’s website and social media. This guided people into advocating for the brand and created a community of consumers sharing their brand experiences.

Nutella personalised packaging, not designed by AKGraphics

Nutella personalised packaging, not designed by AKGraphics

 

Heinz sold personalised cans of soup through a ‘Get Well Soon’ campaign. Each can sold for over twice the price it would regularly, but with the incentive of £1 per can also going to charity, customers appeared willing to pay.

Heinz personalised label, not designed by AKGraphics

Heinz personalised label, not designed by AKGraphics

 

Snickers released 21 symptoms of hunger, in line with their ‘You’re Not You When You’re Hungry’ tagline. Snickers brand director Allison Miazga-Bedrick said: “We believe the new bars will inspire people to not only quickly identify their own symptoms and satisfy their hunger, but give them a new, fun way to call-out friends and family on who they become when they’re hungry, too.”

Snickers packaging, not designed by AKGraphics

Snickers packaging, not designed by AKGraphics

Snickers packaging, not designed by AKGraphics

 

Vegemite – for Christmas, Kmart once sold personalised jars of Vegemite. For $10, consumers could have Kmart print the name of their gift recipient on a 455g jar and send it locally or overseas.

Vegemite label. not designed by AKGraphics

 

To celebrate the relationship consumers have with the brand and drive deeper engagement, Firefly began a campaign where customers can upload pictures of themselves, and also features iconic images from Festival No.6 (the boutique arts and music festival). Customer pictures would be uploaded via the Firefly website, app or through social media using the hashtag #feelingfly.

Firefly packaging, not designed by AKGraphics

Firefly packaging, not designed by AKGraphics

 

While personalised packaging has shown success in these brands, it also has its limitations. With technology constantly updating, perhaps the next stage will be the personalisation of ingredients and recipes, making products truly unique to customers.

This idea is employed in Magnum’s Pleasure Stores, where customers can personalise the flavours and topping of their ice cream –with over 2000 variations possible. These stores have been set up worldwide, including places like New York, London, Singapore, Italy and Portugal. An idea like this makes a brand stand out and gets people talking about it – on social media too with their hashtag #DreamMagnum

Magnum personalised ice creams, not designed by AKGraphics

Magnum personalised ice creams, not designed by AKGraphics

Magnum personalised ice creams, not designed by AKGraphics

Magnum personalised ice creams, not designed by AKGraphics

Magnum personalised ice creams, not designed by AKGraphics

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